Archive

Archive for April, 2010

Using Netcat To Spawn A Remote Shell

April 30, 2010 4 comments

Introduction

Netcat is one of those old school hacking tools that has been around for what seems like an eternity. Its stable release was made available back in March 20, 1996 and is currently available for download at http://netcat.sourceforge.net. That being said…I didn’t even get my first real computer until 1999, which was a Compaq Presario. My knowledge of computers and the Internet was nonexistent but I thought it was so amazing that shortly afterwards enrolled in Computer Career Center and never looked back. Read more…

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Categories: Security

Using NMAP for OS Detection and Versioning

April 24, 2010 Leave a comment

Introduction
Anyone studying for CEH will need to become familiar with using NMAP (Network Mapper) and some of its basic command line syntax. The tool is the creation of Gordon “Fydoor” Lyon and can be downloaded from http://nmap.org/. It’s an old school favorite and should be part of any hacker’s arsenal.   It’s also included as one of the 100 Security Tools listed on Insecure.org.
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Categories: Security

Copy Folder Contents Using Powershell

April 16, 2010 2 comments

I’m someone who has always believed that we should live our lives by example. We are defined by our actions not our words. I recently found a decorative art piece that I’ve hung above my desk that says the following: Excellence is not an act…It’s a habit….Oh how true this is. Very few us have such natural abilities that would, without cultivation, contribute to an immediate rise in excellence. I, my friends…am no exception. In my quest to not just learn Powershell, but master it, I have driven an already overly compulsive individual..myself.. to find any opportunity to…well…Powershell…
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Categories: Powershell

Hiding Files in Alternate Data Streams

April 16, 2010 2 comments

Alternate Data Streams got their start while trying to provide NTFS compatibility with the Macintosh Hierarchial File System (MHF).   The Macintosh file system stores information in the following two forks: Resource and Data.  The data fork contains well…the data and the resource contains info for the OS on how to interpret the data, which is usually held in some type of metadata.   Microsoft’s attempt of resource fork implementation led to Alternate Data Streams.  Read more…

Categories: Security